Alaska Airlines is charging 10,000 miles fewer than it should for one of my favorite awards!

Alaska Airlines miles are awesome because of the breadth of interesting oneworld, SkyTeam, and non-alliance partners on which you can redeem Alaska miles.

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The Mistake Fare

One of the coolest awards you can book is from the United States to Australia or New Zealand on Fiji Airways flights because you can get a free stopover for as long as you’d like in Fiji. Here’s Alaska’s award chart for Fiji Airways flights.

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You can mostly ignore the Business Class prices because Business Class award space is very rare, but the economy prices are great. It costs only 40,000 Alaska miles from the continental United States to Australia or New Zealand with a free stopover in Fiji. From Hawaii to Fiji to Australia or New Zealand is supposed to be 37,500 miles–also pretty good. Commenter Brian points out that alaskaair.com is actually pricing Honolulu to Fiji to Australia or New Zealand at 27,500 miles one way.

I checked it out, and he’s right. This deal is amazing and could be a great way to see Hawaii, Fiji, and Australia or New Zealand on one mega trip.

Fiji Airways flies to six destinations in the region.

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I did a multi-city award search on alaskaair.com to test out what he found.

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This award has a three day stop in Fiji.Screen Shot 2015-09-27 at 6.29.10 PM

It prices at 27,500 Alaska miles + $129, instead of the 37,500 mile price from the chart.Screen Shot 2015-09-27 at 6.29.16 PMSimilarly, a few days stopover in Fiji and then continuing to Sydney is 27,500 Alaska miles.
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I tested out whether the discount also applies from the mainland, and it does not. Los Angeles to Fiji to Sydney is 40,000 Alaska miles.Screen Shot 2015-09-27 at 6.32.01 PM

How to Take Advantage

I know I have a lot of readers in Hawaii, and they can obviously take advantage of this deal.

But even if you live on the mainland, this is a sweet deal.Here is a post on the cheapest awards to Hawaii. They start at 12,500 miles one way, so theoretically for 40,000 miles, you can fly from your home airport to Honolulu to Fiji to Sydney with stops in each place for as long as you’d like.

Here’s what mainlanders should book:

  1. Book a one way award to Honolulu (or another island if you don’t mind paying an $80 interisland ticket to Honolulu to continue the journey)
  2. Book this 27,500 mile award to Fiji plus your choice of six destinations in Australia and New Zealand
  3. Book a one way award home OR a one way award somewhere else to continue your journey (might I suggest this 40,000 United mile First Class award to Southeast Asia from Australia or New Zealand)

Should You Book Right Now?

If this award looks interesting, booking now is smart.

I think this is a mistake that will be corrected by Alaska Airlines sooner rather than later, so lock in the price now. Then use Alaska’s award cancellation policy of free changes or cancellations until 60 days before departure to get out of the award risk free if you decide not to take advantage.

More on Alaska Airlines

For more information on sweetspots, earning Alaska miles, and the Alaska program in general, see Basics of Alaska Mileage Plan.

I also have a longer post on this exact award, quoting the price from the chart instead of the chart alaskaair.com is currently charging.

Bottom Line

Alaska Airlines is mis-pricing awards from Honolulu to Fiji to Australia or New Zealand. Book now and cancel for free up to 60 days before departure.

 

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