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JetBlue is running a two-day promo that ends tomorrow. They emailed their TrueBlue members a mystery code worth $20 to $300 off the purchase of a flight taken between September 14 and November 7.

The code is good for oneways and roundtrips. JetBlue ran a similar promotion on April 30, and this time I was ready! I just scored a roundtrip ticket from Burbank to Las Vegas for $25.

Check your email for a code–check your spam folder too–and head to jetblue.com/promo to figure out its worth.

If you didn’t get one, keep reading. You can get in on the fun too.

Type in an expensive roundtrip flight search–maybe Charlotte to Long Beach–and select an outbound and return. On the right side, you’ll see your discount size after selecting both flights. My discount size was $50.

Now if you can find a fare less than your discount size, your out of pocket expense will be $7. I know that non-Friday/Sunday Los Angeles to Las Vegas flights are routinely less than $50, so I searched LGB-LAS.

Fantastic, but two problems: one I would prefer to fly out of the slightly more expensive Burbank airport. Two, $50 off a roundtrip is great, but $50 off each way would be better.

One of the discoveries of the last JetBlue mystery promo was that the lower value codes could be used more than once. So I broke up my BUR-LAS roundtrip into two oneways and purchased them sequentially.

After my $50 discount each way, the outbound was $18, and the return was $7. The trip insurance I was offered actually cost more than the ticket!

After purchasing the two tickets–now added to my Meet Up page–I tested my code again. It still worked for a $50 discount.

For me, this deal is especially fantastic because, bar none, JetBlue is my favorite airline in coach. Its seats have 34″ of pitch instead of the industry standard 31″, and it offers free DirecTV at every seat.

How can you exploit this offer? If you check your email, and you got this promotional email, go to jetblue.com/promo immediately to find out the size of your discount, which you can do by making any dummy search and selection of flights. Now that you know your discount size, you can price out any trips you may want to take between now and 11/7.

What if you have a code and can’t use it? No worries! They are transferable, so alert a family member or friend who might be thinking about flying soon. If that fails, post your code (and the discount size if you know it) in the comments for another MileValue reader to enjoy.

If your code is under $100, we should all be able to use it.

If your code is more than $100, thanks for sharing. I will email the first three such posters of valid codes $101+, a free GoGo wireless password as a sign of gratitude. (I won a bunch for having Frugal Travel Guy’s deal of the day for my post on buying TACA miles.)

Remember if you try to use a code greater than $75, it is probably only one use. A possible way around this? Break up your roundtrip into oneway segments, and purchase each segment with a different browser at the same time. This is a variation of the two-browser trick we use to get two Citi cards at once.

What if you don’t have a code but want one? Use my $50 code, 8XW36N2K, or a better one from the comments. Hopefully some other readers with codes they can’t use will put their codes in the comments.

This could be the view at the end of your next vacation.

T & C: The promo code emailed to you is good until 9/14/12 (11:59 PM ET) for a one-time mystery discount ranging from $20 to $300 off the base fare of a one-way or roundtrip JetBlue flight (nonstop or connecting) originating from the United States (including Puerto Rico) between 9/14/12 and 11/7/12. Customers purchasing roundtrip travel must select both outbound and return flights within the travel period in order to view and receive the discount. Discount value of promo code will be revealed when you search for a flight before you complete your purchase; purchase required at time of reservation. Code (case-sensitive) is valid for one-time use only for flights purchased on jetblue.com/promo; new bookings only; limit one code per booking. Code is not valid in connection with JetBlue Getaways, award flights, taxes/fees, partner or codeshare or interline flights, baggage fees, or any other products or services. Code cannot be combined with other offers, cannot be partially redeemed, has no cash value, is not redeemable for cash, but is transferable. If flight reservation is changed or cancelled, a $100 fee per person will apply (plus any increase in fare for changes), and the promo code discount will be forfeited and will not apply to any modified or new reservation. Cancellations are for JetBlue travel credit only, valid for one year. If reservation is not changed/canceled prior to scheduled departure, all money associated with reservation is forfeited. Other restrictions apply. See jetblue.com/legal.

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