Singapore Airlines is altering its routes to the United States in October 2016. Currently, Singapore flies from four American cities to Singapore with stops along the way in Europe and Asia.

  • San Francisco to Seoul (ICN) to Singapore
  • San Francisco to Hong Kong to Singapore
  • Los Angeles to Tokyo (NRT) to Singapore
  • Houston to Moscow (DME) to Singapore
  • New York (JFK) to Frankfurt to Singapore

Singapore is making several changes though. It is changing which West Coast city flies to Seoul, and adding a direct flight from San Francisco.

  • Subtracting San Francisco to Seoul (ICN) to Singapore October 22, 2016
  • Adding Los Angeles to Seoul (ICN) to Singapore October 23
  • Adding San Francisco to Singapore October 23

It also changing the routing from Houston to Singapore.

  • Subtracting Houston to Moscow (DME) to Singapore October 29, 2016
  • Adding Houston to Manchester to Singapore October 30

That means from October 30, 2016, the new routes will be:

  • San Francisco to Singapore on the A350-900
  • San Francisco to Hong Kong to Singapore on the new 777-300ER
  • Los Angeles to Tokyo (NRT) to Singapore on the new 777-300ER
  • Los Angeles to Seoul (ICN) to Singapore on the new 777-300ER
  • Houston to Manchester to Singapore on the new 777-300ER
  • New York (JFK) to Frankfurt to Singapore on the A380

The new route map, from October 30, 2016 will look like this:

Screen Shot 2016-07-27 at 8.55.04 PM

Singapore Business Class Product

Singapore Airlines Business Class is among the best in the world. The massively wide seats/beds are laid out in a 1-2-1 configuration on the A350, 777, and A380.

The seats look almost exactly like the Singapore First Class seat and better than the First Class seat on many airlines. In addition, you will get top-notch service, delicious food, expensive alcohol, and lounge access during your journey.

Singapore Business Class is world-class.

Award Prices on New Route Network in Business Class

For Business Class Saver award space (after 15% discount for booking online):

  • San Francisco to Singapore: 68,000 Singapore miles + $253
  • San Francisco to Hong Kong: 63,750 Singapore miles + $23
  • Los Angeles to Tokyo (NRT): 65,785 Singapore miles + $23
  • Los Angeles to Seoul (ICN):  65,785 Singapore miles + $193
  • Houston to Manchester: 48,875 Singapore miles + $193
  • New York (JFK) to Frankfurt: 48,875 Singapore miles + $193

You’ll notice all of the awards are cheap. The awards to Europe being under 50,000 miles and the awards to Hong Kong and Tokyo without fuel surcharges are steals.

These awards can only be booked with Singapore miles, not partner miles like United miles, because Singapore only releases longhaul Business and First Class award space to its KrisFlyer program and not to partners.

You can easily get Singapore miles because Singapore is a 1:1 transfer partner of every major transferable points program. The best ways to earn Singapore miles:

Award Space on New Route Network in Business Class

For all six American routes, I took a look at Business Class award space for one and two people in the first week of November, February, April, and June. (I often uses this method because it should catch seasonal and day-of-the-week variations.)

San Francisco to Singapore: 68,000 Singapore miles + $253

SFO-SIN had award space on 13/28 days for one passenger and 8/28 for two passengers. All of the award space was February 3rd or later. There was award space every day I checked in April.

San Francisco to Hong Kong: 63,750 Singapore miles + $23

SFO-HKG had award space on 3/28 days for one passenger and 2/28 for two passengers, all of which was in April or June.

Los Angeles to Tokyo (NRT): 65,785 Singapore miles + $23

LAX-NRT had award space on 9/28 days for one passenger and 8/28 for two passengers. All of the award space was February 4th or sooner.

Los Angeles to Seoul (ICN):  65,785 Singapore miles + $193

LAX-ICN had award space on 25/28 days for one passenger and 23/28 for two passengers. This new route is by far the most wide open in Business Class at the moment.

Houston to Manchester: 48,875 Singapore miles + $193

IAH-MAN will not operate on Mondays or Thursdays. The route had award space on 10/20 days for one passenger and all 10 of those days had space for two passengers. All of the award space was in November or February, nothing in April or June at the moment on the days I checked.

New York (JFK) to Frankfurt: 48,875 Singapore miles + $193

JFK-FRA had award space on 4/28 days for one passenger and 3/28 for two passengers.

Bottom Line

In October, Singapore is significantly altering its route network to the United States. I checked out Business Class award space on the new routes for November through June and found that it varied significantly by route though all routes have at least some days with award space for two passengers at Saver prices.

Singapore Business Class is worth considering because it is much cheaper than the devalued prices American airlines charge, and it is a world-class product.

To book Singapore Business Class, you need Singapore miles. You can easily get Singapore miles because Singapore is a 1:1 transfer partner of every major transferable points program. The best ways to earn Singapore miles:

Earn 60,000 Chase Ultimate Rewards Points after you spend $4,000 spend in 3 months

Just getting started in the world of points and miles? The Chase Sapphire Preferred is the best card for you to start with.

With a bonus of 60,000 points after $4,000 spend in the first 3 months and 2x points earned on dining and travel spend, this card truly cannot be beat for getting started!

Learn More

Editorial Disclaimer: The editorial content is not provided or commissioned by the credit card issuers. Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of the credit card issuers, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the credit card issuers.

The comments section below is not provided or commissioned by the bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved, or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser’s responsibility to ensure all questions are answered.