Hey there, you’re reading an outdated post! The updated series from April 2015 can be found here.

This is the first post in a monthlong series. Each post will take about two minutes to read and may include an action item that takes the reader another two minutes to complete. I am writing this for an audience of people who know nothing about frequent flier miles, and my goal is that by the end, you know enough to fly for free anywhere you want to go.

In May, I’ll be flying from Los Angeles to Paris in business class in a seat that turns into a six-foot fully flat bed. And in January, I’ll be flying to New Zealand in a seven-foot first class bed and back in a seven-foot business class bed. How would you like to do that for free?

Last September, I flew from Los Angeles to Central America roundtrip for $170. Can you afford that? How about a cross-country flight for $150 roundtrip or a 4-star hotel for $65 a night?

In this series, I’m going to be showing you the tricks that experts use to fly for free in first class anywhere in the world. By next month, you’ll be a pro at earning frequent flier miles for doing things you already do and redeeming them for dream first-class vacations you thought you could never afford.

In addition to frequent flier miles, I’ll be teaching you about how to find incredibly cheap cash fares and hotels, so that you’ve got a full arsenal of ways to travel cheap or free.

If you have two minutes a day, you can enjoy Free First Class Next Month! Bookmark this page, and check back tomorrow when we take the first step to Free First Class Next Month!

Follow me on twitter: @milevalue

Continue to Post 2

Editorial Disclaimer: The editorial content is not provided or commissioned by the credit card issuers. Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of the credit card issuers, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the credit card issuers.

The comments section below is not provided or commissioned by the bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved, or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser’s responsibility to ensure all questions are answered.