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American Airlines updated the look of its award charts today with no update to actual award prices. (Here are expert predictions for the timing and extent of the next award chart changes from American Airlines.)

I liked the old charts better, especially the partner one where all prices could be displayed in one small image.

Screen Shot 2015-03-20 at 11.48.48 AM

Now both the American Airlines chart and partner chart are spread across several pages. You need to select the region of departure first.

Screen Shot 2015-03-20 at 7.04.59 PM

Then the American Airlines chart has four columns for economy awards.

  1. Off peak if applicable
  2. MileSAAver (capacity controlled)
  3. AAnyime Level 1
  4. AAnytime Level 2

Screen Shot 2015-03-20 at 7.05.07 PM

The award chart for partners puts economy, Business, and First Class redemptions on one page because all partner awards price at the MileSAAver level.Screen Shot 2015-03-20 at 7.05.36 PMThe only odd thing is that until today, the American Airlines chart had three levels of AAnytime awards. Now the chart only shows two levels with the most expensive economy award within the mainland United States costing 30,000 miles one way.

Screen Shot 2015-03-20 at 7.05.07 PM

The old chart showed a third AAnytime level of 50,000 miles one way. That price still exists for awards, even though it isn’t on the chart. For instance, here is an award from Syracuse to Indianapolis next week that costs 50,000 miles one way in economy.

Screen Shot 2015-03-20 at 7.14.14 PM

I’m sure this missing AAnytime Level 3 problem will be resolved soon. It’s a minor curiosity only because all of my award bookings are at the off peak and MileSAAver prices.

Getting the Miles

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