Hyatt Gold Passport will turn into The World of Hyatt come March 1, 2017. The entire structure of the loyalty program will change, but here’s the biggest difference:
  • Within Hyatt Gold Passport, you could qualify for the top tier elite status by completing 25 stays (a stay is defined by one check-in and one check-out), or 50 eligible nights.
  • Within The World of Hyatt, the only way to qualify for top tier status is either by completing 60 eligible nights or by spending $20,000 (or earning 100,000 base points) at Hyatt hotelss on eligible nights, their restaurants, spas, etc.
This is good news for people who tend to stay at expensive Hyatts–they might reach the $20k threshold faster than they would meet the 25 stays threshold. But I’d say it’s safe to assume the majority of you don’t spend that much at Hyatts.
And here’s the weird new logo.
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Looks a little better superimposed on an image, but I’m still not the biggest fan.

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If you don’t pursue top tier status at Hyatt, these changes probably won’t make much of a difference to you. If you do, I suspect you’ll either be overjoyed or (more likely) pissed with this news.

Here are the other significant changes that I’ll detail below:
  • There will be three elite tiers instead of two, defined by different benefits.
  • More free night certificates will be available to earn overall (by all members and elites).
  • More Access to Suite Upgrades for Upper Elites
  • You won’t earn 10 elite qualifying nights by spending $40,000 on the Hyatt credit card anymore like you currently can.

Major Changes to Hyatt’s Loyalty Program

Elite Status Earned Via Nights or Spend, not Nights or Stays 

In Hyatt Gold Passport, you can qualify for Platinum status by completing five eligible stays (a check-in and check-out is one stay) or 15 eligible nights. Diamond’s thresholds are 25 stays or 50 nights.

In the World of Hyatt, you’ll qualify for elite status by completing eligible nights or spending enough money:

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Everyone including basic members without status earn base points at a rate of 5 points per $1 dollar spent, so to translate that chart for you, you’d need to spend:

  • $5,000 each calendar year at Hyatt hotels to achieve Discoverist status
  • $10,000 each calendar year at Hyatt hotels to achieve Explorist status
  • $20,000 each calendar year at Hyatt hotels to achieve Globalist status

Note that free night awards still won’t count as a Qualifying Night towards status under the new program, only paid stays do. So you can either spend the necessary amount above, or pay for the necessary amount of nights above–whichever threshhold you hit first.

I assume this doesn’t apply to many of you, but read this if you want to learn how to qualify for elite status via setting up meetings or events.

Three Elite Tiers Instead of Two

The elite tiers of Hyatt Gold Passport are Platinum and Diamond. World of Hyatt’s tiers will be Discoverist, Explorist, and Globalist.

Check out the benefit package of each new elite tier– Discoverist, Explorist, and Globalist. There’s also a handy table that shows how the elite tiers compare to each other.

More Free Night Certificates Overall

Anyone (no matter whether you’re just a member or have elite status) will earn a free night at a Category 1-4 Hyatt after staying at five different Hyatt brands.

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The Andaz Peninsula Papagayo Resort, a Category 4 Hyatt

This benefit will kick in as of March 1, 2017, so any variety of brands you stay at until then won’t count towards that free night.

The maximum free nights you will be able to earn this way is two as there are 11 Hyatt brands total:

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When you qualify for Explorist status, you’ll receive a free night in a Category 1-4 Hyatt.

When you qualify for Globalist status, you’ll receive a free night in a Category 1-7 Hyatt.

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Park Hyatt Beaver Creek Resort & Spa, a Category 7 Hyatt

You can keep earning those free nights each year, including when you requalify. The certificates do need to be used within 120 days of when they’re earned though.

More Access to Suite Upgrades for Upper Elites

Globalists, the highest tier elite status, will receive unlimited suite upgrades on all stays subject to availability at check-in. This is much better than what Diamond offers now, which is an upgrade to the best available room (except for suites) subject to availability at check-in.

Globalists will also get four confirmed suite upgrades valid on all stays (paid and award nights). Currently Diamond elites get four confirmed suite upgrades as well, but they’re only good for paid and Points + Cash stays.

No More Elite Qualifying Nights Earned by Credit Card Spend

Hyatt Passport Gold’s current rules state that you can earn 10 eligible nights that count towards elite status by spending $40,000 on the Hyatt Credit Card. This seems fair considering that Hyatt isn’t the most widespread chain and not everyone has the opportunity to log enough eligible nights to qualify for status.

But under World of Hyatt’s rules that will not be the case. Spending on the Hyatt Credit Card will not earn eligible nights that count toward elite status. That being said, spending $50,000 on the Hyatt Credit Card will earn you Explorist status–but that’s not the top tier and doesn’t come with nearly the same suite upgrade benefits that Globalist does.

Other Notable Changes To Hyatt’s Loyalty Program

For the most part the only significant changes are to the highest tier status.

  • Resort fees will be waived for Globalists on any kind of stay (award or paid)
  • In the absence of a club lounge, Globalists will not be compensated the 2,500 bonus points they used to be as a Diamond elite, but they will get a full breakfast for two adults and two children
  • Globalists will get free parking when they’re redeeming points (but not on paid or Points + Cash stays)
  • Globalists will receive the four annual confirmed suite upgrades as soon as they requalify for status (valid for 12 months post-issuance)
  • There will be new incentives for completing more paid stays beyond qualifying for the highest tier elite status (up to a potential 40k bonus points or four extra confirmed suite upgrades):
    • Stay 70 nights, get 10k bonus points or another confirmed suite upgrade
    • Stay 80 nights, get 10k bonus points or another confirmed suite upgrade
    • Stay 90 nights, get 10k bonus points or another confirmed suite upgrade
    • Stay 100 nights, get 10k bonus points or another confirmed suite upgrade
  • Once you qualified for Globalist status once, the next year you’ll only need 55 eligible nights (or 100,000 base ponts) to requalify
  • Globalists will not receive the 1,000 point welcome amenity

Benefits Remaining for the Top Tier

  • Guest of Honor benefit
  • Two free United Club passes each year
  • Club Lounge access

What the Transition Will Look Like

If you have any, this is what’s going to happen to your Hyatt status early next year:

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Bottom Line

As of March 1, 2017, the structure of Hyatt’s loyalty program will change pretty drastically for those that pursue top tier status.

The overarching change is the way you will qualify for the highest tier elite level, now called Globalist. Instead of qualifying by 25 stays or 50 eligible nights, in the future you’ll qualify by spending $20,000 at Hyatts or completing 60 eligible nights. That’s good for those that spend a lot of money at Hyatts, and sucks for those who were getting by on 25 stays.

Hat tip One Mile At a Time

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